Famous vegetarian and Congressman, Dennis J. Kucinich of Ohio. As a typical vegetarian, he is hardly a model of health. He looks like someone who is either an A.I.D.S. victim, or someone undergoing chemotherapy. This ghoulish look is typical amongst vegetarians.
Undoubtedly, many of our readers assume that we adhere to either a vegetarian or a vegan diet. In truth, we are strongly against such extremes. As people interested in truthful health reporting, instead of politics; it is our duty to inform our readers that vegetarianism is absolutely unhealthy and dangerous. This report may cost us some of our readers, but that is a risk that we are willing to take if it might save a few people from disease; and especially if it could save a few children from dying horribly. This is not a popularity contest for us. This is life or death, and the truth versus a cult.

There is nothing more perverse than when those who conform to such politics also dictate the same malnutrition upon their own children. News stories of children who have starved to death as a result of vegan diets continue to appear, and these diets are usually defended by the parents as being something good, all the way to prison. It is unknown how many uncounted child vegan deaths there have been, because child deaths are usually attributed to mysterious disorders; for regular doctors rarely examine nutrition.

Such parenting is based much more on following a cult than it is about health, and we feel certain that there is a deep pocket in Hell waiting for such parents. Starving one's children is the epitome of evil, regardless of whatever strained rationalizations are used to justify it. It is never justified. Such parents ought to be deeply ashamed, but few of them seem to be, even after the deaths of their own children. Their belief system overrides both their rational thinking and their consciences, and this is why we think of them as being cultish, in almost the same vein as the iodine drinkers. A child fed on a diet containing soy (the vegan protein substitute) is destined for illness for the rest of his life, with poor development combined with future thyroid and hormone issues. Furthermore, the lack of fats in a vegan diet makes just growing problematic. Red meat contains iron, which is desperately needed by growing children. Synthetic iron provided in supplements quickly becomes poisonous if allowed to accumulate, especially to infants and children, in addition to it being an extremely ineffective substitute for organic forms of iron. A rusty nail would probably be safer and more effective than most of the iron supplements, but of course, we are not recommending that.

Around twenty years ago, it was widely agreed in the scientific community that vegetarians do not get enough protein. This stance has since changed, because of deceptive marketing by the soy industry and political pressures exerted by the cult. Soy provides just enough protein for a vegetarian or vegan to survive, and it comes with great consequences. Soy, which is always genetically modified, is damaging to the thyroid, can cause infertility, causes deficiencies of zinc, deficiencies of iron, and scoliosis in children. Those who attempt a meat-free diet without soy usually fail, because they cannot get enough protein otherwise, even when nuts and legumes are used. For example, it would take 136 almonds, 239 peanut kernels, or 3.7 cups of kidney beans for a 140 lbs. person to get the bare minimal amount of protein needed each day. These conservative measurements are based on the R.D.A. (Recommended Daily Allowances), which have been repeatedly shown to be much lower than what is actually needed by healthy individuals.

Vegetarians often believe that they will have a longer lifespan as a result of their diets, but studies identifying any such relationship are scarce. There are two main studies that are used to show that a vegetarian diets extend lifespan. The first study, titled 'Diet, Metabolism and Lifespan in Drosophila', is religiously cited as the 'proof', and it utilized fruit flies as the test subjects. Researchers gave the fruit flies a diet just slightly above malnutrition, and found that they lived longer than the over-fed flies. Who would have expected that fruit flies could live best on fruit, or that overeating harms health? Should we give any credibility to such studies, which purport that malnutrition is beneficial? This is clearly F.D.A. science, except this time, it's our side who is cooking the numbers for political reasons. Fruit flies are hardly representative of humans, of course, and keeping one's diet just above complete malnutrition is not a wise long-term health plan. The research also showed that while the flies did actually live longer, they experienced more health problems, including infertility. The second study, titled 'Lifestyle Determinants and Mortality in German Vegetarians and Health-Conscious Persons', which was conducted by the German Cancer Research Foundation, showed that those who lived the longest were those who consumed small amounts of meat and fish in their diet. Therefore, the real core finding (the very one being ignored by the vegetarian cults) is that the under consumption of meat is as unhealthy as the over consumption of it. The latter study is also misquoted regularly for the sake of propaganda. The two studies discussed in this paragraph are the alpha and the omega of vegan 'scientific proof'. They have nothing else to stand on, and the ice is starting to crack beneath their feet.

A lack of carnosine has been noticed as the Achilles heel of vegetarians, and this is especially true with the much more extreme vegan diets. Carnosine is a dipeptide which protects against aging, is a copper and zinc chelating agent, increases the lifespan of cells, is a pH buffer, assists in the contraction of the heart muscle, protects the brain from excitotoxins, and helps to prevent Alzheimer's disease (possibly through its extraction of heavy metals). Carnosine is only found in meat. Some vegetarians try to compensate with supplements, but such attempts are futile, due to the rate at which carnosine is excreted. When 248 mg. is consumed, it becomes undetectable within 5.5 hours. The minuscule synthetic 50 mg. supplements commonly used by vegetarians and vegans are useless.

It has become widely known that vegetarians do not get enough vitamin B-12. The lucky vegetarians seem healthy for several years before developing problems related to B-12 deficiencies. B-12 deficiencies result in a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, problems with the central nervous system (CNS), tingling in the hands and feet, fatigue, anemia, and can eventually cause permanent damage including blindness, deafness and dementia. These problems are exaggerated in the elderly.

While we do recommend juice fasting for short periods, especially for those who are suffering with certain chronic diseases; we would never recommend any permanent meat-free diet. We are aware that this article is likely to upset some people, but it is essential that these warnings are given. Vegetarian and vegan lifestyles have been embraced like a cult by those who refuse to listen to data, which conflicts with their religion. While people initially choose to experiment with these lifestyles for different reasons, these diets are always ultimately dangerous. All the health problems which have been associated with typical meat consumption only occur in meats which are laced with nitrates, antibiotics, and growth hormones. Even the hysteria surrounding saturated fats has been thoroughly debunked. We need those saturated fats, in moderation, of course. There are no valid reasons to avoid meats, because there are completely safe organic choices with animals that have been given their natural diets. The only typical meat that we avoid and recommend that others avoid is pork, for its help-to-harm ratio is poor.


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Jenny Pack
# How much meat? Jenny Pack 2014-02-13 20:54
Thank you so much for this article! I feel like there is a lot of misinformation about these topics and it's really difficult to sort through it all.

I've been semi vegetarian/vegan for several years, but only because I seem to have a difficult time digesting meat, even if it's organic. This is even after being on a diet that doesn't include processed foods. Eating meats tend to give me sharp intestinal pains and constipation. I also avoid dairy products only because (even organic and sugar free products) tend to cause a lot of excess mucus in my lungs and sinuses. I'd really like to incorporate these food into my diet, but can't seem to get past the reaction my body seems to have to them. Do you have an information on possible reasons this could be happening?
Also, what is your recommended amount of meat and dairy products daily/weekly for optimal health?

Thanks again.

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The Claimer: The information provided herein is intended to be a truthful and corrective alternative to the advice that is provided by physicians and other medical professionals. It is intended to diagnose, treat, cure, and prevent disease.