You can safely bleach your own teeth using a natural substance: oxygen. Simply rinse and gargle with oxygenated water, more commonly known as hydrogen peroxide, every time that you brush your teeth. In a matter of weeks, a tremendous change will be seen in the color of the teeth. The oxygen from hydrogen peroxide will safely bleach teeth white. If caught early enough, gargling with hydrogen peroxide can sometimes wipe-out a sore throat infection. Unlike fluoridated toothpastes, it can even be swallowed without the necessity of a visit to a hospital. Ingestion of low doses is actually good for the body. The main side effect is a reduced cancer risk. The ideal peroxide is 3% strength or weaker of food grade hydrogen peroxide. Normal hydrogen peroxide contains chemical stabilizers and other additives, which may get absorbed into the body.

For the best teeth, real butter should be added to the diet. Butter can actually eliminate small cavities, and it provides fat-soluble vitamins that are hard to find elsewhere. Toothpastes that contain monocalcium phosphate are ideal, because they can help to remineralize damaged teeth. Avoid any toothpaste that contains sodium lauryl sulphate or sodium laureth sulphate. These industrial degreasers are terrible for the health. Fluoride should always be avoided too, and it is specifically known to darken teeth.

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Mark Blondin
# Mark Blondin 2013-01-27 01:26
Could a person use hydrogen peroxide and baking soda together or separate?
Is that a bad combination?


Jules Ferris
# Jules Ferris 2014-10-05 11:26
I have tried rinsing with food grade hydrogen peroxide 3%, but it makes my teeth very sensitive, so don't do it. Why would this be? Does it indicate another health problem?
Sarah C. Corriher (H.W. Researcher)
# Sarah C. Corriher (H.W. Researcher) 2014-10-06 17:05
Double check that your peroxide is 3%, and not 35%. Most food grade peroxide is 35%, and it would make the teeth sensitive.

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The Claimer: The information provided herein is intended to be a truthful and corrective alternative to the advice that is provided by physicians and other medical professionals. It is intended to diagnose, treat, cure, and prevent disease.